NC Environmental Secretary stops in Spruce Pine

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Michael Regan visits Museum of NC Minerals, Harris Middle

  • North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality Secretary Michael Regan listens to staff from the North Carolina Geological Survey talk about landslide mapping capabilities Thursday, Nov. 14, at the Museum of North Carolina Minerals in Spruce Pine. (Submitted)
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North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality Secretary Michael Regan listens to staff from the North Carolina Geological Survey talk about landslide mapping capabilities Thursday, Nov. 14, at the Museum of North Carolina Minerals in Spruce Pine. (Submitted)

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SPRUCE PINE – North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality Sec. Michael Regan was in Spruce Pine this past week to conclude a three-day trip to Western North Carolina that included stops in Avery, Mitchell, McDowell and Rutherford counties. 

Reagan visited the Museum of North Carolina Minerals in Spruce Pine Thursday, Nov. 14, to see the connection between geology, the environment, tourism and the economy in the western part of the state.

The final stop on Regan’s trip was at Harris Middle School Friday, Nov. 15, where he spoke with Ms. Sam Sirois’ eighth-grade science students about renewable and non-renewable energy sources and answered students’ questions.

“After several days in the western part of the state, including a visit to the Museum of North Carolina Minerals, it was great to conclude the trip by speaking to students at Harris,” Regan said. “STEM education is vital for today’s economy and also for preparing the leaders of tomorrow to take on the issues facing their generation, which will include climate change.”

Regan toured Harris Middle School and visited with Ruby the school dog before departing for Raleigh.

“North Carolina is known for a world-class public education system, and Mitchell County is fortunate to have these STEM programs, so many brilliant students who care about the environment, and of course, Ruby the school dog,” Regan said. “I also want to thank Blue Ridge Conservation and Development for their support of environmental education in Western North Carolina. I loved getting to open up and engage with the students and answer their questions and we couldn’t have asked for a better way to conclude our visit to the area.”

Regan’s visit to the Museum of North Carolina Minerals Thursday was to see the connection between geology, the environment, tourism and the economy in the Western North Carolina.